Book Study: Courageous Conversations About Race…Chapter 3: Why Race?

Book Study: Courageous Conversations About Race…Chapter 3: Why Race?

I’m reading a great book about how to talk about race. It’s called Courageous Conversations About Race: A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools, Second Edition, by Glenn E. Singleton.

I previously shared notes about earlier parts of the book, so check those out if you’re interested:

Here are my notes from Chapter 3:

  • “Both [liberals and conservatives] fail to see that the presence and predicaments of Black people are neither additions to nor defections from American life, but rather constitutive elements of that life.” -Cornel West
  • “…people of color face an enormous challenge as they attempt to find a foothold in a nation that has never fully respected them or granted them equality.”
  • “Until teachers discover a love, empathy, and authentic desire to reach their students of color, these children will not develop to their full social, emotional, and academic potential.”
  • “…true racial equality in our habits of heart and mind remains elusive.”
  • “To work toward equality requires tremendous effort on the part of all racial groups–the racially advantaged and the racially disadvantaged.”
  • “The aim of this book is to help educators improve their achievement of all students while narrowing the gaps between the lowest and highest performing groups and eliminating the pattern by which racial groups predictably and disproportionality occupy the highest and lowest achievement categories.”
  • Remember “…with liberty and justice for all.”
  • “White people must embrace their responsibility to challenge the awarding and acceptance of privilege.”
  • “…race as socially constructed rather than biologically determined…”
  • “…sustainable reform will occur only when White people individually and collectively embrace and encourage change.”
  • “…people are more comfortable talking about poverty, or gender, but they avoid talking about race.” -Julie Landsman
  • “…these studies also have the potential to provide evidence of the inherent racial biases in the SAT…”
  • “White students achieve scores that are quite similar across a broad income spectrum…[but] the scores of all groups of color show substantial change from lowest to highest income groups.”
  • “Often, Asian students face ‘positive’ racial discrimination and stereotyping…”
  • “…members of the dominant racial culture tend to search for and acknowledge primarily economic differences when explaining social stratification and academic achievement disparities.”
  • “…the students’ socio or racial/cultural background appears to have a more powerful impact on participation and performance than their economic status.”
  • “…we have found the racial achievement gap to be the most difficult gap to address.”
  • “As expectations, opportunities, resources, and access become equitable across all racial groups, the gaps close, because all students are supported in the differentiated way necessary to achieve success.”
  • “systemic racism…the unexamined and unchallenged system of racial biases and residual White advantage…”
  • “…vision of accelerating the rate of achievement of Latino and Black students, while sustaining the continued growth of their White and Asian counterparts.”
  • “…opportunity gaps [is] a statistic that compares rates of progress toward proficiency among racial subgroups.”
  • “By addressing race as an essential and foundational issue, [the school] dealt effectively with all known factors impacting student performance.”
  • “Many educators struggle to take personal and professional responsibility when it comes to meeting the needs of students of color and indigenous students who are not succeeding.”
  • “Effectively talking about race and addressing racism whenever and wherever it appears is an integral part of our responsibility to transform schools into inclusive, rigorous environments for ALL.”
  • “race [is] the socially constructed meaning attached to a variety of physical attributes…”
  • “racism…can be defined as beliefs and an enactment of beliefs that one set of characteristics is superior to another set…”
  • “a racist would be any person who subscribes to these beliefs and perpetuates them intentionally or unconsciously.”
  • “…racism is the conscious or unconscious, intentional or unintentional enactment of racial power, grounded in racial prejudice, by an individual or group against another individual or group perceived to have lower racial status.”
  • “…racism does not require intent.”
  • “Racism is different from prejudice. A person of color can hurt a White person because of prejudice. The difference is that in this country, people of color face systematic and ongoing personal and institutionalized biases every day.”
  • “Other groups do not have the racial power, presence, and position necessary to maintain the prejudicial acts over time and throughout society without abatement.”
  • “Racism becomes institutionalized when organizations…remain unconscious of issues related to race.”
  • “To serve students of color equitably, it is essential to challenge institutionalized racism and vigilantly reduce individual racial prejudices.”
  • “…institutionalized racism equates to prejudice connected with the power to protect the interests of the discriminating racial group.”
  • “Rarely is intentional discrimination the central problem in the teacher-student relationship; rather, the discrimination includes unquestioned assumptions on the part of the institution within which these interactions take place.”
  • “The stating point in deinstitutionalizing racism is to believe first and foremost that racism exists.”
  • “…when White students enter an advanced placement classroom and see few if any students of color, they are unconsciously indoctrinated into White intellectual supremacy.”
  • “To eradicate these harmful practices, school communities must focus their efforts on intentionally and explicitly addressing systemic racial disparities, wherever they may exist.”
  • “Achieving true equity for all students must be a moral imperative, and it serves as a central and essential component of any attempt to eliminate racial achievement disparities.”
  • “All students can benefit from a focus on equity, because an equitable school system is one that works to address the needs of each individual child.”
  • “Educational equity is
    • “raising the achievement of all students, while
    • “narrowing the gaps between the highest and lowest performing students, and
    • “eliminating the racial predictability and disproportionality of which student groups occupy the highest and lowest achievement categories.”
  • “Equity is an operational belief that enables educators to provide whatever level of support is needed to whichever students require it.”
  • “Equity…recognizes that the playing field is unequal and attempts to address the inequality.”
  • “Equity is not a guarantee that all students will succeed. Rather, it assures that all students will have the opportunity and support necessary to succeed.”
  • “In an equitable system, the barriers that inhibit student progress are removed.”
  • “…equity means that the students of greatest need receive the greatest level of support to guarantee academic success.”
  • “In coming to understand racism and institutionalized racism, it is not enough simply to become non-racist. Educators of all races should become anti-racists, which means to actively fight racism and its effects wherever they may exist.”
  • “Anti-racism can be defined as conscious and deliberate efforts to challenge the impact and perpetuation of institutional White racial power, presence, and privilege.”
  • “To be anti-racist is to be active. Simply claiming to be non-racist and to ‘not see race in others’ passively allows racism to continue.”
  • “Anti-racist schools move beyond the celebration of diversity and create communities in which it is possible for students to talk about how they experience unfairness and discrimination and to heal.”
  • “As White educators are prompted to examine race and practice anti-racism, they need to be aware that White privilege counteracts their engagement by offering the opportunity to walk away from this conversation on race at times when it gets tough or personally uncomfortable. People of color and indigenous people face racial injustice daily and simply cannot avoid dealing with racism.”
  • “There is no gray zone in anti-racist work.”
  • “…providing quality education for all children is not a question of educators’ experience or academic degrees; rather, it is a question of their personal willingness to fulfill their professional responsibilities.”
  • “Race matters in society and in our schools.”
  • “By understanding race and its impact on schooling, as well as by having a vision of equity and the courage to be anti-racists, educators will fortify their will.”
Advertisements